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How to write abbreviations?

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pjvv1 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pjvv1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: How to write abbreviations?
    Posted: 12/Apr/2011 at 2:31pm
Dear friends,

I work in one hospital and we are using WSR to let doctors dictate clinical texts.

Users want some expressions to be written differently as WSR does. For example, "75 grames per square meter" => to be written as "75 g/m2".

How can I do that in WSR?

Thanks in advance.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12/Apr/2011 at 6:21pm
Originally posted by pjvv1

Users want some expressions to be written differently as WSR does. For example, "75 grames per square meter" => to be written as
How can I do that in WSR?
Simply write a text macro with the spoken form, "75 gee slash meter squared." Have the written form as "75 g/m2".
 
The WSRToolkit Version 2 uses step by step wizards to easily create text as well as command macros. It has many more features as well, all for a reasonable price. CLICK HERE to see this.
 
Marty Markoe, eMicrophones, Inc.
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pjvv1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/Apr/2011 at 1:31pm
I didn't explain myself right.

Macros could be an option for isolated sentences, but it doesn't work when I am dictating (e.g. "bla bla bla 75 grames per square meter bla bla bla").

Is it possible to do that? How?

Thank you very much!


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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/Apr/2011 at 2:06pm
Originally posted by pjvv1

Macros could be an option for isolated sentences, but it doesn't work when I am dictating (e.g. "bla bla bla 75 grames per square meter bla bla bla").
Dictate numbers by prefixing the number with the word, "numeral." For example, if I want to say the number seventy-five, I can say, "numeral 75."
 
I now say the macro titled, "grams per square meter" that has the written form, " g/m2." Macro is below my name.
 
I can now say 75 g/m2, or 50 g/m2, etc. I did have to train the phrase g/m2 using the Dictionary function of the WSRToolkit V2. I entered g/m2 as the written form and added the pronounciation, "Grams per square meter." Now every time I say g/m2 it comes up the way you want it to.
 
Marty
 
<!-- Command macro created with WSRToolkit (Version: 2.0.4.0) 4/14/2011 11:53:15 AM -->
<speechMacros>
<command>
<condition operator="not">
<appIsInForeground processName="WSRToolkit.exe"/>
</condition>
<listenFor>Grams per square meter</listenFor>
<insertText>
g/m2
</insertText>
</command>
</speechMacros>
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Quote pjvv1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14/Apr/2011 at 2:23pm
Thanks again, but that choice is not right for us. Macros need a pause when dictating to say the command to work. I am pretty sure that's something doctors will not tolerate.

The solution of pronunciating all expression must work but it is too slow to pronounce all the possibilities. Anyway, will it work for all users?

Regards,
Pedro
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mmarkoe_admin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15/Apr/2011 at 1:40am
Originally posted by pjvv1

Thanks again, but that choice is not right for us. Macros need a pause when dictating to say the command to work. I am pretty sure that's something doctors will not tolerate.
I've found physicians to be generally be bright understanding people. All you need explain is the 1/2 second pause is more than made up for by the shortcut and reduced corrections. Think of presenting it this way, 5 macros require a total of 2.5 seconds in pauses. 5 corrections can take 30-60 seconds.
 
The solution of pronunciating all expression must work but it is too slow to pronounce all the possibilities. Anyway, will it work for all users?
Will it work for all users? Experiment and you'll find out.
 
Marty
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Post Options Post Options   Quote mpatton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/Mar/2012 at 12:40pm
1. Add a new word, spelled "g/m2"
2. train it by saying "gee emm two" or "gee emm slash two"
3. save the word with its pronunciation
 
To test the new word, open Notepad, and say the following as continuous speech (i.e. with no pauses): "the patient had seventy-five gee emm two white cells in his blood period". 
 
When I added the new word and said the above sentence, this is what appeared in my Notepad window:
 
"The patient had 75 g/m2 white cells in his blood."
 
New words added using the process above are not part of a macro and therefore do not require a pause.
 
All you have to do is train your doctors to say "gee emm 2", which is way faster than saying "grams per square meter". 
 
Obviously, other abbreviations can be similarly programmed as custom words. 
 
For example, "kilogram meters per second squared" (i.e. "kgm/s2") which is 9 syllables, could be programmed as "kay gee emm ess two" which is only five syllables.
 
Of course, if you wanted to be truly creative you could train the word "g/m2" with the spoken phrase "shama-lama-ding-dong" or "doodlie-squat", although I doubt the doctors would remember it.
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